New book by Rebecca Adler-Nissen – University of Copenhagen

Forward this page to a friend Resize Print Bookmark and Share

English > News > New book by Rebecca Ad...

15 August 2014

New book by Rebecca Adler-Nissen

Book Release

New book by Associate Professor Rebecca Adler-Nissen being published in October 2014.

"Opting Out of the European Union: Diplomacy, Sovereignty and European Integration" is the title of Associate Professor Rebecca Adler-Nissen's new book. Read more about the book and pre-order it here.

European integration continues to deepen despite major crises and attempts to take back sovereignty. A growing number of member states are reacting to a more constraining EU by negotiating opt-outs. This book provides the first in-depth account of how opt-outs work in practice. It examines the most controversial cases of differentiated integration: the British and Danish opt-outs from Economic and Monetary Union and European policies on borders, asylum, migration, internal security and justice. Drawing on over one hundred interviews with national representatives and EU officials, the author demonstrates how representatives manage the stigma of opting out, allowing them to influence even politically sensitive areas covered by their opt-outs. Developing a political sociology of European integration, the book shows how everyday negotiations transform national interests into European ideals. It is usually assumed that states opt out to preserve sovereignty, but Adler-Nissen argues that national opt- outs may actually reinforce the integration process.

Advance praise: ‘This is an excellent book which covers an important and timely topic in an innovative and useful way. I have no doubt that this will be a work of great interest to students of European studies, international theory, and diplomatic studies. It demonstrates the value of incorporating sociological approaches into the study of the increasingly wider and more important spaces which are developing between the insides and the outsides and about which much of IR theory struggles to speak coherently.' - Paul Sharp, University of Minnesota, Duluth